Overblog Suivre ce blog
Administration Créer mon blog
9 février 2008 6 09 /02 /février /2008 14:01
FANTASTIC.jpg
A Ray Of Sunshine
Paroles et musique : GEORGE MICHAEL 

Move it move it baby
Can't you see i'm ready to dance?
And I can't stop this rhythm in my heart
Move it move it baby
Can't you see i'm ready to dance?
Without this beat my life would fall apart
Shuffle on your feet till the floor is hot
Gotta make alot of money, gonna break your heart
Watch out boy (watch out boy)
Shuffle on your feet till the floor is hot
Gotta make alot of money, gonna break your heart
But i'm the only one with the key
And that's me
Sometimes
You wake up in the morning with the bass line
A ray of sunshine
Sometimes
You know today you're gonna have a good time
And you're ready to go
Move it move it baby
Can't you see i'm ready to dance?
And I can't stop this rhythm in my heart
Move it move it baby
Can't you see i'm ready to dance?
Without this beat my life would fall apart
Shuffle to the beat, gonna take a cut
There's money in your feet, gimme what you got
Watch out boy (watch out boy)
Shuffle to the beat, gonna take a cut

There's money in your feet, gonna stitch you up
Any other boy that you see

But not me
Sometimes
You wake up in the morning with the bass line
A ray of sunshine
Sometimes
You know today you're gonna have a good time
And you're ready to go
Turn the music up
Turn the music up, turn it up
Because it's all I've-
All that I've got
Shuffle to the beat...






BAD BOYS 

Paroles et musique :  GEORGE MICHAEL




badboys.jpg

Woo Woo
Dear Mummy, Dear Daddy
You had plans for me (oh yeah)
I was your only son
And long before this baby boy could count to three
You knew just what he would become
Run along to school
No child of mine grows up a fool
Run along to school
When you tried to tell me what to do
I just shut my mouth and smiled at you
One thing that I know for sure
Bad Boys
Stick together, never sad boys
Good guys
They made rules for fools, so get wise...
Dear Mummy, Dear Daddy
Now I'm nineteen, as you see
I'm handsome, tall and strong
So what the hell gives you the right to look at me
As if to say "Hell, what went wrong?"
Where were you last night?
You look as if you had a fight

Where were you last night?
Well I think that you may just be right
But don't try and keep me in tonight

Because I'm big enough to break down the door
Bad Boys
Stick together, never sad boys
Good guys
They made rules for fools, so get wise...
Boys like you, are bad through and through
Girls like me, always seem to be with you ...
We can't help but worry
You're in such a hurry
Mixing with the wrong boys
Playing with the wrong toys
Easy girls, late nights, cigarettes and love bites
Why do you have to be so cruel?
You're such a fool
Bad Boys
Stick together, never sad boys
Good guys
They made rules for fools, so get wise.

Bad Boys
Stick together, never sad boys
Good guys

They made rules for fools, so get wise...





LOVE MACHINE 
Paroles et musique :  Moore/ Griffin 

REFRAIN
I'm just a love machine
And I won't work for nobody but you
I'm just a love machine
A huggin', kissin' fiend
I think it's high time you knew
Whenever I think of you, my mind blows a fuse (baby)
When I look in your eyes, my meter starts to rise
And I become confused
My voltage regulator cools, when I'm sitting next to you
Electricity starts to flow, and my indicator starts to glow - Wooo
REFRAIN
Na, na na na na, na na na na, woo-woo-woo
Na, na na na na, na na na na, na naaah
REFRAIN
I'm gentle as a lamb, I'm not that hard to programme
There's no way that you can lose
My chassis fits like a glove, I've got a button for love
That you have got to use
If you look into my file, I am sure you can find out how
To turn me on just set my dial, and let me love you for a little while - ooh
REFRAIN
Na, na na na na, na na na na, woo-woo-woo
Na, na na na na, na na na na, na naaah
I'm just a love machine
And I won't work for nobody but you
I'm just a love machine
A huggin', kissin' fiend
REFRAIN






W
HAM RAP !
Paroles et musique : GEORGE MICHAEL et ANDREW RIDGELEY

wham-Rap.jpg
WHAM!
BAM!
I AM!
A MAN!
JOB OR NO JOB, YOU CAN'T TELL ME THAT I'M NOT
DO!
YOU!
ENJOY WHAT YOU DO?
IF NOT
JUST STOP!
DON'T STAY THERE AND ROT!
You got soul.....
You got soul.....
I said get, get, get on down, said get, get, get on down
I said get, get, get on down, said get, get, get on down
Hey everybody take a look at me
I've got street credibility
I may not have a job, but I have a good time
With the boys that I meet "down on the line"
I said, I-DON'T-NEED-YOU
So you don't approve, well who asked you to?
HEY-JERK-YOU-WORK
This boy's got better things to do
Hell,
I ain't ever gonna work, get down in the dirt
I choose, to cruise
Gonna live my life, sharp as a knife
I've found my groove, and I just can't lose
A1, Style from head to toe
Cool cat flash, gonna let you know
I'm a soul boy-I'm a dole boy
Take pleasure in leisure, I believe in joy!
(REFRAIN)
Party nights, and neon lights
We hit the floors, we hit the heights
D
ancing shoes, and pretty girls
Boys in leather kiss girls in pearls!
Hot-damn! Everybody, let's play!

So they promised you a good job-NO WAY!
One, Two, Three Rap!
C'mon Everybody, DON'T NEED THIS CRAP!
(REFRAIN)
IF YOU'RE A PUB MAN, OR A CLUB MAN
MAYBE A JET BLACK GUY WITH A HIP HI-FI
A WHITE COOL CAT WITH A TRILBY HAT
MAYBE LEATHER AND STUDS IS WHERE YOU'RE AT
MAKE THE MOST OF EVERYDAY
DON'T LET HARD TIMES STAND IN YOUR WAY GIVE A WHAM GIVE A BAM BUT DON'T GIVE A DAMN
COS THE BENEFIT GANG ARE GONNA PAY!
Now reach up high and touch your soul
The boys from Wham! will help you reach that goal
It's gonna break your mama's heart
It's gonna break your daddy's heart
But you'll throw the dice, take my advice
Because I know that you're smart
Can you dig this thing?
YEAH! Are you gonna get down?

YEAH!
Say Wham!
WHAM!
Say Bam!
BAM!

(REFRAIN X3)
INSTRUMENTAL BREAK
Do you want to work?
NO
Are you gonna have fun?

YEAH
Said One, Two, Three Rap!, C'mon Everybody
DON'T NEED THIS CRAP!
ENJOY WHAT YOU DO?
ENJOY WHAT YOU DO?
ENJOY WHAT YOU DO?
ENJOY WHAT YOU DO?
ETC...
Everybody say Wham!
WHAM!
Say Wham! Bam!
WHAM! BAM!
ENJOY WHAT YOU DO?
ENJOY WHAT YOU DO?
(D.H.S.S.)
ENJOY WHAT YOU DO?
ENJOY WHAT YOU DO?
(D.H.S.S.)
ENJOY WHAT YOU DO?
(REFRAIN)




CLUB TROPICANA
Paroles et musique: GEORGE MICHAEL et ANDREW RIDGELEY


Club-Tropicana.jpg

Let me take you to the place
Where membership's a smiling face,
Brush shoulders with the stars,
Where strangers take you by the hand,
And welcome you to wonderland -

From beneath their panamas...
Club Tropicana drinks are free,
Fun and sunshine-there's enough for everyone.
All that's missing is the sea,
But don't worry, you can suntan !
Castaways and lovers meet,
Then kiss in Tropicana's heat,
Watch the waves break on the bay.
Oh, soft white sands, a blue lagoon,
Cocktail time, a summer's tune,
A whole night's holiday !
Club Tropicana drinks are free,
Fun and sunshine-there's enough for everyone.
All that's missing is the sea,
But don't worry, you can suntan !
Club Tropicana drinks are free,
Fun and sunshine-there's enough for everyone.
All that's missing is the sea,
But don't worry, you can suntan !
Pack your bags,
And leave tonight.
Don't take your time,
Gotta move your feet, don't you miss the flight !
Pack your bags,
And leave tonight
Don't take your time,
Gotta move your feet, don't you miss the flight !
Cool, cool, cool, cool
Club Tropicana drinks are free,
Fun and sunshine-there's enough for everyone.
All that's missing is the sea,

But don't worry, you can suntan !
Cool, cool, cool, cool
Cool, cool, cool, cool 





NOTHING LOOKS THE SAME IN THE LIGHT
Paroles et musique : GEORGE MICHAEL et ANDREW RIDGELEY



I watch you breathe,
I cannot sleep,

I touch your hair,
I kiss your skin,
And hope the morning sun won't wake you too soon.
For when you wake,
And look at me.
You never know,
You just might see.
Another boy who crept in your room...
Take your time...(that's what you told me),
Take your time...
But I fell head first, and I just don't know what to do.

Nothing looks the same in the light
Only a fool like me would take to heart,
The things you said you meant last night,
Nothing looks the same in the light, I'll keep my feet firm on the ground.
Nothing looks the same in the light,
There's danger in a stranger,
With a warm hand and a kiss so right.
Nothing looks the same in the light,
It's been a pleasure, - see you around...

I watch the sun,
Upon the sheets,
I hear a car,
Out on the street.
And gently pull you close,
It's over too soon.
What can I do, but wait and see
Hold on to you, please stay with me,
Because you're the first
And I want to stay here with you.

Nothing looks the same in the light
Only a fool like me would take to heart,
The things you said you meant last night,
Nothing looks the same in the light, I'll keep my feet firm on the ground.
Nothing looks the same in the light,
There's danger in a stranger,
With a warm hand and a kiss so right.
Nothing looks the same in the light,

It's been a pleasure, - see you around...




COME ON
Paroles et musique : GEORGE MICHAEL


 REFRAIN
Come On, Everybody!
Get on, with your party!
And don't let nobody say you're wrong.
O.K.
So you've lost control,
But they'll never steal your soul.
No way!
That they're gonna spoil your fun.

Greedy men, in far off places,
Don't be afraid to show your faces.
We know what you've done is wrong,
But clap your hands, and sing along now!
Don't even bother, to let us know,
When you flick the switch and stop the show,
Because the party has begun,
And we'll still be dancing, as-you-run-now!

(REFRAIN)

Oh no, don't think that I'm not scared,
Oh no, don't think that I'm prepared.
I just take each day as it comes,
Because it may - it may -, It may be the last one!
I know they don't care about me,
I ain't got no money, ain't a V.I.P.
And I know they don't care about you,

You may - as well - enjoy your life like I do!





YOUNG GUNS ( Go For It )
Paroles et musique: GEORGE MICHAEL

Young-Guns.jpg

Hey sucker,
(What the hell's got into you?)
Hey sucker,
(Now there's nothing you can do).
Well I hadn't seen your face around town a while,
So I greeted you, with a knowing smile,
When I saw that girl upon your arm,
I knew she won your heart with a fatal charm,
I said "Soul Boy, let's hit the town !"
I said "Soul Boy, what's with the frown ?"
But in return, all you could say was
"Hi George, meet my fiancee"
Young Guns,
Having some fun,
Crazy ladies keep 'em on the run.
Wise guys realize there's danger in emotional ties.
See me, single and free,
No tears, no fears, what I want to be.
One, Two, take a look at you,
Death by matrimony!
Hey sucker,
(What the hell's got into you?)
Hey sucker!
(Now there's nothing you can do)
A married man? You're out of your head,
Sleepless nights, on an H.P. bed
A Daddy by the time you're twenty-one
If your happy with a nappy then you're in for fun.
But you're here -
And you're there -
Well there's guys like you just everywhere,
Looking back on the good old days?
Well this young gun says CAUTION PAYS!
Young Guns,
Having some fun,
Crazy ladies keep 'em on the run.
Wise guys realize there's danger in emotional ties.
See me, single and free,
No tears, no fears, what I want to be.
One, Two, take a look at you,
Death by matrimony!
I remember when we had such fun and everthing was fine,
I remember when we use to have a good time,
Partners in crime.
Tell me that's all in the past and I will gladly walk away,
Tell me that you're happy now, Turning my back -
Nothing to say!
"Hey tell this jerk to take a hike,
There's somethin' 'bout that boy I don't like",
"Well sugar he don't mean the things he said",
"Just get him outta my way, 'cause I'm seeing red,
We got plans to make, we got things to buy ,
And you're wasting time on some creepy guy",
"Hey shut up chick, that's a friend of mine,,
Just watch your mouth babe, you're out of line"
OoooooH!
GET BACK
HANDS OFF
GO FOR IT!
GET BACK
HANDS OFF
GO FOR IT!
Young Guns,
Having some fun,
Crazy ladies keep 'em on the run.
Wise guys realize there's danger in emotional ties.
See me, single and free,
No tears, no fears, what I want to be.
One, Two, take a look at you,

Death by matrimony!


Repost 0
5 février 2008 2 05 /02 /février /2008 16:30

314528_303684242979667_230006733680752_1502421_1018080271_n.jpg

Repost 0
Published by Miss Yog - dans PHOTOS
commenter cet article
14 février 2007 3 14 /02 /février /2007 16:10

Pop Romance
Date parution 14 Février 2007





What's life like for one of the most famous couples in showbiz? Tracey Emin hooks up with George Michael and Kenny Goss - and discovers that beyond the world of private planes and screaming fans, there's an everyday love story
Published: 14 February 2007
It was 1986. I had just left art school. Everything was a struggle but life was exciting; it was as if anything could happen. I had some friends in the media world who lived in a very nice flat in Notting Hill Gate. They were fond of me and fond of my work and they came up with this genius idea of me doing a very large painting in their apartment. It was a commission of sorts, but I could do whatever I wanted.

Every day I travelled from Rochester in Kent to west London. Notting Hill was hip and trendy but, unlike now, it definitely had an itch. There was a whiff of West Indian skunk and a hangover of Donald Cammell and his film Performance. I found it all quite exciting.

I had my own keys to let myself in to the apartment. It took a good couple of weeks to do the painting. Every day my friends would leave me coffee in a saucepan (because I didn't know how to use a percolator), and I'd have some delicacy to eat, like dim sum, or alfalfa sandwiches in grainy rye bread, all of which seemed very exotic. I was very happy making the painting and I was very careful not to make a mess.

They trusted me implicitly, but there was one golden rule. They lived on the ground floor, but under no circumstances was I to allow anybody into the rest of the building. It didn't matter how many times they rang the bell or even if they banged on the window, I was to ignore it. There were a couple of photographers in the building with quite expensive equipment and my patrons, being good neighbours, were simply being responsible.

So there I was, listening to Talking Heads as loud as I could, painting away at my Turkish boat going underneath the bridge at Rochester, when I heard the doorbell ring. In fact, it didn't stop ringing. I stopped prancing around in my dungarees to see a guy leaning across the steps waving at me through the window. He was smiling but looked slightly agitated. The window was double-glazed, so I couldn't hear exactly what he was saying. I went out of the flat into the hall and knelt down at the letterbox to be eye level with the guy's crotch. He bent down to the letterbox and said: "Please, please let me in. You gotta let me in."

I told him I was really sorry. I explained the situation. The more I said I really couldn't let him in, the more desperate he became. He was so nice, I felt really sorry for him, but there was nothing I could do. He even told me his name, but it made no difference to me. All I could do was say sorry.

The next day there was a note for me by the stove. All it said was: "I hear that you left George Michael on the doorstep yesterday."


The next time I came across George (or George came across me) was in very different circumstances. It was more than 10 years later. I was sitting in The Ivy with the gallery director Carl Freedman (and, I have got to admit, very, very drunk) when from the table next to us a very smiley, handsome man wriggled his way across the chairs so he was facing me. He spoke with the most amazing, jaw-dropping, sexy Texas twang. "Sorry to interrupt," he said, "but you're Tracey, and my boyfriend is a big fan of your work and he'd love to say hello."

I was already enchanted and said: "Bring him over." But to my absolute amazement, the person sitting next to me on the banquette just smiled and said: "Hi, I'm George." I remember we had a really great chat, mainly about Cyprus. George gave me his phone number and I promised I'd ring him. I remembered looking at this torn-off piece of paper that said "George Michael", with a phone number underneath. Carefully putting it into my pocket (in my pathetic, drunken stupor), I thought: "I mustn't lose that." Of course, I did. But I remember thinking at the time how many millions and trillions of women in the world would love to have George Michael's phone number. Even though it was his boyfriend, Kenny, who lit George's fire, I still mentally associated George with millions of screaming female fans.

Years later, I bumped into George and Kenny at Heathrow airport, as we all rolled off a BA flight from Berlin. George and I had both shown our films at the 2004 Berlin Film Festival. It was brilliant. We all hugged and, even though we hadn't seen each other for years, we were strongly in each other's psyche. George had been hitting the headlines for many different reasons and I, too, had had my fair share of flak. We shared a spirit of camaraderie as we waited for Kenny to clear immigration. And then the pair of them swiftly disappeared through a secret door, special services.

The next time George and I meet it's at another airport. We are standing on the runway just about to board a private jet. Here I was, flying across the Irish Sea, with the Womble beside me, George and Kenny opposite. George's lovely sisters (who are extremely funny) are on board too, along with the rest of the entourage. George's dad, Jack, is due to meet us later in Dublin at the concert as he's got a bit of a cold and George has to look after his voice. I'm a bit disappointed about this because Jack is a Greek Cypriot and I'm hoping to have a chance to talk about Cypriot politics. George and Kenny are very relaxed. George holds Kenny's hand, raises it to his lips and kisses it as the jet climbs through the cloud, and a faint moment of nerves passes through us all.

I can't help but think how manly George and Kenny look. There's nothing poofy about them. It's more like an ancient thing, like a real man thing. Maybe it is, I smile to myself. George the ancient Greek and Kenny the Cherokee Indian. Then I start to laugh because there is no way they look like the Village People. There's nothing camp about George and Kenny whatsoever.

They've been flying around in this plane for the whole tour, and at no time has any of them seemed to take it for granted. Not George, not Kenny, not any of us. I'm genuinely excited and after a couple of glasses of wine, I started to bombard George with questions.

I look across to George and my eyes flash. "When's your birthday?"

"June the 25th," he says "And we're both Cancerian and both born in the same year, 1963."

"So you're 43 as well?" I say. "Don't you find it weird?"

He laughs. I know why he's laughing. Why should any age be weirder than any other? And then I say to him: "Forty two was a really bad one." He nods and agrees quite earnestly and then says: "You come from Margate?" "Yeah," I say. "Have you been Googling me?" "No," he says, "I've just always been interested in Margate, 'cause I used to go there as a kid." "Yeah," I say, "There used to be a massive Cypriot community down there."

I remember in 1974 it was my and my brother's birthday party. We were going to the Isle of Sheppey for a picnic and our friend Mario Papagigio wasn't allowed to come and we telephoned him and shouted down the phone: "We want Mario Papagigio!" George said: "Yeah it was a mess, the war. You and I are similar. I'm half Greek Cypriot. My mum was English. Your dad's Turkish Cypriot and your mum's English." And, quite foolishly, I tell him that we're listed somewhere as the most famous people from Cyprus.

And then, more seriously, I say: "Your mum and dad - have they always been proud of you?" George goes quiet for a while, looks up sadly and replies: "Yeah. I think really proud." This is a special thing about George. You can see as you speak to him that there is no formulaic answer. It's almost like he's thinking about it for the first time, or reiterating how he feels.

George's mum died a few years ago, and you can tell as you are talking to him that he was incredibly close to her. She comes across as a big influence, almost like a mentor of sorts. A fascinating thing about George, about the whole Panayiotou family, is that they are so "family" and they are really, really funny. I think almost any one of them could take to the stage and be a stand-up comedian. They come across as very open but also extremely tight-knit and protective. I put this down as a Mediterranean thing.

I ask George how it was for his family when he came out. "It was OK by then because I was successful. I had achieved something. I was in a position where I could take care of myself, and often success can take care of a lot of other things." I then ask George and Kenny: "Do you worry about getting old?" Between them, their ages add up to nearly a century. They both turn and smile, and I know the answer should be yes, but it's actually a lot more complicated. Kenny is very happy and contented, but gets frustrated with himself sometimes. It's like he wants to learn more, faster, but there is never enough time to do it.

We reflect on the fact that we can't do all the things we used to do. We then discuss whether we still do the things we used to do. They then ask: " Tracey, what makes you feel old?" I reply, "I've never had children, and now I'm really getting too old to have children," before adding: " Don't give me that crap about the woman who was 57 who had a baby in Italy last week!"

They laugh, so I say to George: "Have you ever wanted to have children?" "No," he groans, and, pointing his thumb at Kenny, adds: "But if he had his way, there'd be no stopping him!" Kenny interjects: " Now, George," in his really sexy Texan drawl ,"you know that isn't exactly true. I love children. I love my godchildren, nieces, and nephews, but most of all, I think people who don't have children, like us, should take more responsibility for those children who need help."

On this point, I think Kenny is absolutely right, and I ask them: "Do you think people who don't have children are different from people who do? A different species, a different kind? And do you think being gay means that you have a different kind of relationship?" The answer, of course, is yes. "So, as gay men, is your commitment within a relationship different to a heterosexual's?" Kenny replies: "Tracey, have you ever slept with a woman?"

"Yes - of course I have. I think most women have. It's called safe sex! You don't hear many women say, 'I'm off across the Heath tonight to do a bit of cruising.' Why is it OK for gay men to have such open relationships?" George says: "Maybe we've already discussed it. Maybe it's about the children thing, or maybe it's just a way of life for some people. What do heterosexual people do?" "They sleep with their friends," I say, "which somehow is a real fuck-up."

I change the subject, to make things a bit lighter. I say, "Sorry I didn't come and see you in Earls Court, but I had seen the BBC news coverage from Manchester. Thousands of women beside themselves with absolute ecstasy, crying, laughing. I can't remember how many thousands of women it was, but I decided I couldn't cope with it at Earls Court. Why do you think it is that women love you so much? It's so obvious you're gay and always have been." I think silently of all the men who must have whispered slowly into the ears of their lady friends, "If you're gonna do it, do it right. Do it with me. Now listen... I'll be your boy, I'll be your man, I'll be the one that understands..." So I say to George: "Why do you think a lot a men dislike you so much?" He looks at me completely stony faced, 100 per cent dry. "Because they feel cheated." We land.


I always get the jitters going to big concerts. To be honest, I don't really like them. The crowds, the hotdogs, the coldness and then the sweat, but this time in Dublin everything feels very gentle, very at ease. There's a sense of very thorough, military organisation, down to every last detail. In among the crowds of thousands I feel very safe and cosy, nestled between Kenny and George's larger-than-life family.

The atmosphere is electrifying. The crowds are ecstatic. My favourite moment of the whole concert is when George raises his hand towards where we are sitting and calls out to the crowd: "This song's for Kenny, Kenny, the love of my life." And the whole crowd goes into raptures. Good going for a predominantly Catholic audience; good going for any audience when you think how much things have changed in the past 20 years.

It isn't really a pop moment, it feels very classical and I think about the voice of George Michael that I remember from 20 years ago. The high-octane, beautiful teen. Now what I'm listening to is the voice of a man plus thousands of screaming women.

Now I realise why women adore George Michael so much. He simply has an incredible voice and the fact that he's gay makes him even more lovable. Given the choice of a shoulder to cry on, who would you rather have, Barry White or George Michael? George Michael or Barry White? I'm even happy to throw Robbie Williams into the equation. When we listen to love songs, to ballads, we want to trust the words that we're hearing and be able to translate them into our own lives.

George Michael is definitely on the side of vocal integrity. On top of that, he's big enough to admit his own failings, and that's exactly what he's doing to the audience. It's incredible. He apologises for being gone for so long, but now he's back. In between every song, he explains the lyrics or what the song means to him. The whole crowd is intoxicated with warmth.

Later on, back in George and Kenny's suite, we are having a late dinner. Room service arrives. The mood is very relaxed and George is genuinely happy. I ask George and Kenny lots of intimate questions but for some reason the conversation always reverts to talking about my breasts. I ask Kenny how he and George first met. "I met George at a really posh..." and then he stops. "Well, actually, we have two stories. There's the one that we tell people and the one in which we actually met. There's a really posh spa called the Beverly Hot Springs. It's a very straight, above-board spa but, you know, if we tell people we met in a spa they always get the wrong idea. So we often tell people that we met at Fred Segal." I burst out laughing and say: "The shop?" "Yes," says Kenny, " The shop." "But that sounds really camp."

Kenny continues: "Well this was 11 years ago. George still had a very strong private life then. Everyone knew he was gay but he hadn't actually come out. We just thought it sounded better that we say we met at Fred Segal's, but now we don't say it any more, we always say we met at Beverly Hot Springs because, you know, we would be at a dinner table with 10 people and some would ask us the same question at the same time and one of us would always tell a different answer so now we always say the truth. We met at a spa." I ask them if they think it is important to tell the truth. They both nod earnestly and George says simply: "Life's too short."

He has a song, "My Mother Had a Brother". The lyrics are about his uncle, who died suddenly and tragically, apparently on the day that George was born. There's mention of suicide and fear and a burden of hidden homosexuality. The number of people who walk around in life never being themselves. Being afraid of themselves, disagreeing with their internal reflection and suffering internal, physical heartache because they are well and truly closeted. George is right. Life is too short.

I leave their room at four in the morning, quite tipsy, feeling really happy and I go to sleep with the voice of an angel in my mind. Love doesn't have to be the same for everybody.

Tracey Emin, George Michael, Kenny Goss and Scott Douglas support the Terrence Higgins Trust. Tracey and Scott's fees for this article have been donated to the charity. The Terrence Higgins Trust Lighthouse Gala Auction will be held on 12 March



A quoi ressemble la vie d’un des plus célèbres couple du showbiz ?

Tracey Emin s’est introduit chez George Michael et Kenny Goss et a découvert que derrière le monde des avions privés et des fans hurlants, il y  avait une histoire d’amour de tous les jours.

C’était en 1986. Je venais de quitter l’école d’art. Tout était une bataille mais la vie était excitante. C’était comme si tout pouvait arriver. J’avais quelques amis dans le monde des médias qui vivaient dans un très joli appartement à Notting Hill gate. Ils m’adoraient et adoraient mon travail et ils sont arrivés avec l’idée géniale que je fasse un très grand tableau dans leur appartement. C’était un véritable complot mais je pouvais faire ce que je voulais.
Tous les jours, j’allais de Rochester dans le Kent à West London. Notting Hill était branché mais, pas comme maintenant : Il y avait une odeur de moufette indienne et des relents du film Performance de Donald cammel. Je trouvais cela très excitant.
J’avais mes propres clefs de l’appartement. Cela m’a pris deux bonnes semaines pour faire ce tableau. Tous les jours mes amis me laissaient du café dans un saucier (parce que je ne savais pas utiliser le percolateur), et j’avais toujours quelque chose de bon à manger, comme des sandwiches à la luzerne avec ce pain de seigle, tout cela semblait très exotique. J’étais très heureuse de faire ce tableau et je faisais très attention à ne pas mettre de désordre.
Ils me faisaient confiance implicitement, mais il y avait une règle d’or à respecter : ils vivaient au rez de chaussée mais sous aucun prétexte je ne devais faire entrer quelqu’un d’autre dans le reste du bâtiment, peu importe le nombre de fois qu’ils sonnent à la porte ou s’ils tapaient à la fenêtre, je devais les ignorer. Il y avait un couple de photographes dans l’immeuble avec du matériel très coûteux et mes patrons, en tant que bons voisins, en étaient responsables.
Alors, j’étais là, écoutant Talking Heads de plus en plus fort, peignant mon bateau turc passant sous le pont de Rochester, quand j’entendis la sonnerie retentir. En fait, elle n’arrêtait pas de sonner. J’ai arrêté de me balader en salopette en voyant un gars qui me faisait signe à travers la vitre. Il souriait mais semblait très agité. C’était un double vitrage et je n’entendais pas ce qu’il disait. Je suis sorti de l’appartement et me suis agenouillé prés de la boite aux lettres au niveau de l’entrejambe du gars. Il s’est penché vers la boite à lettre et m’a dit « s’il vous plait, laissez moi entrer, vous devez me laisser entrer »
Je lui ai dit que j’étais désolé et lui ai expliqué la situation. Plus je lui expliquai et plus il était désespéré. Il était si gentil, j’étais vraiment désolé pour lui mais je ne pouvais rien faire. IL m’a même dit son nom mais ça n’a pas fait de différence pour moi. Je pouvais juste dire que j’étais désolé.
Le lendemain, il y avait un mot pour moi prés de la cuisinière « j’ai entendu dire que tu as laissé George Michael à la porte hier «
La fois suivante ou j’ai rencontré George (ou plutôt il est venu à moi) c' était dans des circonstances nettement différentes .C’’était il y a plus de 10 ans. J’étais assise au Ivy avec le directeur de la galerie Carl Freedman (et je dois admettre très très saoule) quand de la table voisine est venu un magnifique homme, en face de moi. Il parlait avec cet accent texan fantastique et si sexy « excusez moi de vous déranger mais vous êtes Tracey et mon petit ami est fan de votre travail et voudrait vous saluer »
J’étais enchantée et dit "amenez le". Et à ma grande surprise, la personne qui s’est assise juste à côté de moi a souri et a dit « Salut, je suis George ».Je me rappelle que nous avons eu une grande conversation sur Chypre. George m’a donné son numéro de téléphone et je lui ai promis de l’appeler. Je regardais ce morceau de papier ou était marqué George Michael avec un numéro de téléphone au verso. Je l’ai mis dans ma poche en faisant très attention et j’ai pensé « Je ne dois pas le perdre ». Bien sur, je l’ai perdu. Mais je me rappelle avoir pensé à ce moment combien de millions de femmes voudraient avoir le numéro de téléphone de George Michael. Même si c’était son petit ami Kenny qui faisait battre son coeur, j’associais toujours George avec des millions de filles hurlantes.
Des années plus tard, je tombais sur George et Kenny à Heathrow air port,
alors que nous revenions d’un vol à Berlin. George et moi avions présenté nos films au festival du film de Berlin en 2004. C’était fabuleux. Nous nous sommes embrassés et même si nous ne nous étions plus vus depuis des années, nous étions toujours présents dans l’esprit de l’autre.
George avait fait la une des journaux pour beaucoup de raisons différentes et moi, aussi, j’avais eu mon lot de critiques. Nous avons partagé un franc esprit de camaraderie en attendant Kenny qui passait le contrôle de l’immigration. Puis, tous les deux ont disparu subitement par une porte secrète.
La fois suivante où nous nous sommes rencontrés George et moi étions dans un autre aéroport. Nous attendions sur la piste, d’embarquer dans un jet privé. J’étais là, volant au dessus de la mer d’Irlande, George et Kenny en face de moi. Les adorables soeurs de George (qui sont très drôles) étaient à bord aussi, avec le reste de l’entourage. Le Papa de George, Jack devait nous rencontrer plus tard, à Dublin, au concert parce qu’il était un peu grippé et George devait faire attention à sa voix. J’étais un peu déçu parce que Jack est un chypriote grec et je voulais parler de politique chypriote avec lui.
George et Kenny sont très calmes. George tient la main de Kenny, la porte à ses lèvres et l’embrasse pendant que le jet monte vers les nuages. Un faible moment de nervosité nous traverse tous.
Je ne peux m’empêcher de penser que George et Kenny sont si masculins. Il n’y a rien de «tapette » en eux. C’est plus comme quelque chose d’ancien, d’homme authentique. Ca l’est peut-être. George l’ancêtre grec et Kenny l’indien cherokee. Et je commence à rire parce qu’ils ne ressemblent en rien aux Village People. De toute façon, il n’y a vraiment rien d’effeminé en eux.
Ils ont volé dans cet avion pendant toute la tournée, et à aucun moment, pour aucun d’entre eux, ce n’était gagné. Ni George, Ni Kenny, ni aucun d’entre nous. Je suis terriblement excitée et âpres quelques verres de vin, je commence à bombarder George de questions.
J’ai regardé vers George et mes yeux ont brillé :
 « Quelle est la date de votre anniversaire ? »
« Le 25 Juin » dit-il « et nous sommes tous les deux Cancer et tous les deux nés la même année, 1963"
"Alors vous avez 43 ans aussi ? » dis-je . Vous ne trouvez pas ça bizarre ?
Il rit. Je comprends pourquoi : Pourquoi un âge serait-il plus bizarre qu’un autre ? et je lui dis : "42 ans était une mauvaise année". Il hocha la tête et acquiesce d’un air sérieux puis me demanda : "vous venez de Margate ? "Oui"répondis je « j’ai toujours été intéressé par Margate car j’y allais quand j’étais enfant" me dit-il.
Oui dis-je. Il y avait beaucoup de chypriotes là bas.
Je me rappelle en 1974, c’était mon anniversaire et celui de mon frère. Nous allions sur l’île de Sheppey pique niquer et notre ami Mario papagigio n’avait pas le droit de venir, nous lui avons téléphone et hurlé "nous voulons Mario Papagigio" George dit " Oui c’était le désordre, cette guerre. Toi et moi sommes semblables. Je suis moitié chypriote grec. Ma mère était anglaise. Ton père est un chypriote turc et ta mère anglaise".
Et bêtement, je lui dis que nous faisions partie d’une liste des gens les plus connus de Chypre.
Et, plus sérieusement, je lui dis :"ta mère et ton père ont-ils toujours été fiers de toi ?"  George est resté silencieux pendant un moment, a paru triste et a répondu : "Oui, je pense très fiers". Il y a quelque chose de spécial chez George. Vous pouvez voir en lui parlant qu’il n’y a pas de réponses préparées. C’est comme si il y pensait pour la première fois, ou réfléchit à nouveau à ce qu’il ressent.
La maman de George est morte il y a quelques années et on peut sentir en lui parlant d’elle qu’il était incroyablement proche d’elle. Elle était d’une grande influence, comme un mentor. Il y a quelque chose de fascinant chez George et même chez sa famille entière, c’est qu’ils sont très "famille" et ils sont très, très drôles. Je pense que chacun d’entre eux pourrait monter sur scène et faire un "one man show". Ils apparaissent très ouverts mais aussi très protecteurs. Je pense que c’est leur côté méditerranéen.
Je demande à George quelle a été la réaction de sa famille quand il a fait son coming out.  " C’est bien passé car j’avais du succès. J’avais réussi quelque chose. J’étais en position de m’occuper de moi et souvent le succès peut aussi prendre en charge beaucoup de choses " Ensuite, je leur demandai à tous les deux "est ce que ça vous inquiète de vieillir ?" A eux deux, ils ont presque un siècle. Ils se sont regardés et ont souri et j’ai compris que la réponse était oui mais c’est beaucoup plus compliqué que cela. Kenny est très heureux mais frustré quelquefois. Il voudrait apprendre encore et encore mais il n’a jamais assez de temps pour cela.
Nous avons réfléchi sur le fait de ne plus pouvoir faire ce que nous faisions auparavant. Puis ils m’ont demandé : »Tracey, qu’est ce qui te fait sentir que tu as vieilli ? » . J’ai répondu : « Je n’ai jamais eu d’enfants et maintenant je suis trop vieille pour en avoir » avant d’ajouter « Ne me sortez pas cette sordide histoire de cette femme de 57 ans qui a eu un bébé en Italie la semaine dernière »
Ils se sont mis à rire puis j’ai dit à George « n’as-tu jamais voulu avoir d’enfant ? » Non a-t-il gémi et pointant son doigt vers Kenny et a ajouté « Mais si il avait pu, on n’aurait pas pu l’arrêter « Kenny intervient : « Maintenant, George, avec son accent texan si sexy, tu sais que ce n’est pas exactement la vérité. J’adore les enfants. J’adore mon beau fils, mes nièces et neveux mais surtout, je pense que les gens qui n’ont pas d’enfant, comme nous, doivent prendre plus de responsabilités pour tous ces enfants qui ont besoin d’aide.
Sur ce point, je pense que Kenny a entièrement raison, et je leur demande : "pensez vous que les gens qui n’ont pas d’enfant soient différents de ceux qui en ont ? » et pensez vous qu’être gay signifie que vous vivez une relation différente ? La réponse, bien sur est oui.
« Alors, en tant qu’homosexuels, votre engagement dans une relation est différent de celui des hétérosexuels ? " Kenny me répond : « Tracey, as-tu déjà couché avec une femme ? »
« Oui, bien sur, je l’ai fait. Je pense que la plupart des femmes l’ont déjà fait. Ca s’appelle du sexe sans danger. Tu n’entends pas les femmes dire « bon, ce soir je sors et vais chasser « Pourquoi est ce que c’est normal pour les hommes gays d’avoir ce type de relations ? »
George dit : » peut-être que nous en avons déjà parlé. Peut-être que ça remonte à l’enfance, ou que c’est une façon de vivre pour certains. Que font les hétérosexuels ? Ils couchent avec leurs amis, dit-il ce qui parfois fait vraiment tout foirer «

Je change de sujet, pour alléger l’atmosphère. Je dis « désolée je ne suis pas venue te voir à Earls court, mais j’ai vu le reportage aux infos de la BBc à Manchester. Des milliers de femmes hors d’elles en extase, qui pleuraient, qui riaient. Je ne me rappelle pas combien de milliers elles étaient mais je me suis dit que Earls Court ne pouvaient pas toutes les contenir. Pourquoi pensez vous que les femmes vous aiment autant ? C’est si évident que vous êtes gay et l’avez toujours été. Je pense intérieurement à tous les hommes qui ont murmuré à l’oreille de leur petite amie « If you’re gonna do it, do it right. Do it with me. Now listen... I'll be your boy, I'll be your man, I'll be the one that understands..."
Alors je dis à George"Pourquoi pensez vous que tant d’hommes ne vous apprécient pas? Il me regarde, le visage de glace et me répond sèchement : « parce qu’ils se sentent trahi ». Et nous atterrissons.

J’ai toujours eu peur d’aller dans des gros concerts. Pour être honnête, je n’aime pas ça. La foule, les hot dogs, la chaleur et la transpiration, mais cette fois à Dublin, tout semblait si calme, très facile. Il y a un sentiment d’organisation militaire, chaque détail est pensé. Et au milieu de milliers de personnes, je me sens en sécurité et bien, comme dans une immense famille de Kenny et George.
L’atmosphère est maintenant électrique. Le Public est en extase. Mon moment préféré a été quand George a tendu les mains vers l’endroit où nous étions assis et a déclaré à l’assistance « cette chanson est pour Kenny, l’amour de ma vie « Et tout le public était ravi. Une bonne chose pour un public majoritairement catholique, bonne chose pour n’importe qui quand vous pensez combien les choses ont changé en 20 ans.
Ce n’est pas vraiment un moment de pop, c’est plus classique et je repense à la voix de George Michael d’il y a 20 ans. Une voix très belle et très aigue de jeunesse. Maintenant, j’écoute la voix d’un homme plus celles de milliers de femmes qui crient.
Maintenant, je comprends pourquoi les femmes adorent George Michael. Il a simplement une voix incroyable et le fait qu’il soit gay le rend encore plus adorable. Si vous aviez besoin d’une épaule sur qui pleurer, qui choisiriez vous, Barry White ou George Michael ? George Michael or Barry White? Je suis quand même contente de ne pas mettre Robbie Williams dans cette équation " Quand nous écoutons des chansons d’amour, nous voulons croire ce que nous entendons et être capable de transposer ces mots dans nos propres vies.
George Michael a acquis son intégrité vocale. Et en plus, il est assez fort pour admettre ses faiblesses, et c’est exactement ce qu’il fait avec son public. C’est incroyable. Il s’excuse d’être parti si longtemps, mais maintenant il est de retour. Et entre chaque chanson, il en explique les paroles et ce qu’elle signifie pour lui. La foule entière est remplie de chaleur humaine.

Un peu plus tard, de retour dans la suite de George et Kenny, nous dînons tardivement. Le room service arrive. L’ambiance est relax et George est vraiment heureux. Je leur pose beaucoup de questions intimes mais pour d’obscures raisons, la conversation revient toujours sur ma poitrine. Je demande à Kenny comment lui et George se sont rencontrés « J’ai rencontré George dans un très chic « " et il s’arrête « en fait, nous avons deux histoires. Il y a celle que nous racontons aux gens et l’autre, la vraie. Il y a un très chic spa qui s’appelle le Beverly hot springs. C’est très strict mais si nous disons aux gens que nous nous sommes rencontrés dans un spa, ils en ont toujours une fausse idée. Nous disons souvent que nous avons fait connaissance chez Fred Segal « J’éclate de rire et je dis « le magasin ? » « Oui « dit Kenny, » le magasin « mais ça, ça fait très gay «
Kenny continue : "c’était il y a 11ans. George avait toujours une vie très privée. Tout le monde savait qu’il était gay mais il ne l’avait pas avoué publiquement. Nous avons pensé que ce serait mieux de dire que nous nous étions rencontrés chez Fred Segal mais nous ne le disons plus, nous disons la vérité car imaginez que nous soyons à une table de 10 et que plusieurs personnes nous posent la question en même temps et que nous ne donnions pas la même réponse ! Maintenant, nous disons toujours la vérité. Nous nous sommes rencontrés dans un spa. » Je leur demande si c’est important de dire la vérité. Ils hochent tous les deux la tête et George dit simplement « la vie est trop courte «
Il a une chanson "My Mother Had a Brother". Elle parle de son oncle qui est mort soudainement et tragiquement, apparemment le jour de sa naissance. Il parle de suicide, de peur et d’homosexualité cachée. Le nombre de gens dans la vie qui ne peuvent être eux-mêmes, qui en ont peur, qui souffrent à l’intérieur, parce qu’ils sont bel et bien enfermés en eux. George a raison. La vie est trop courte.
Je quitte leur chambre à 4 heures du matin, un peu pompette, me sentant vraiment heureuse, et je vais dormir avec la voix d’un ange dans la tête. L’amour n’est pas le même pour tout le monde.

Tracey Emin, George Michael, Kenny Goss et Scott Douglas soutiennent le Terrence Higgins Trust. Les honoraires deTracey et Scott pour cet article ont été donnés à cet organisme de charité. Il y aura un gala pour Terrence Higgins Trust Lighthouse Gala le 12 Mars .

Repost 0
4 juillet 2005 1 04 /07 /juillet /2005 10:26

 

 

 

Live 8


2nd July 2005 Hyde Park, London


'Drive my car' w. PaulMcCartney


 

 

Repost 0
Published by Miss Yog - dans APPARENCES DIVERS
commenter cet article
3 mai 2005 2 03 /05 /mai /2005 15:05

 

Interview BBC Radio 2 le 18 Décembre 2004 avec Paul Gambaccini

 

 

 

Bonsoir tout le monde, ici Paul Gambaccini sur BBC Radio2 pour une émission  ‘Sold on Song’ spéciale avec George Michael. Il a enregistré trois performances pour nous, nous sommes dans les Air Studios à Londres, Hampstead pour être précis, dans le nord de Londres. Pas loin du coin où George a grandit et dont il parle dans sa chanson Round Here.

 

(Round Here)

 

Round Here par George Michael donc pour commencer cette édition très spéciale de ‘Sold on Song’, exclusivement sur BBC Radio2. Je suis Paul Gambaccini et la personne à mes côtés est George Michael.

 

Paul Gambaccini: Salut George !

 

George Michael: Salut, comment vas-tu ?

 

PG:

Très bien, merci. Cette chanson provient de l'album Patience, et c'est l'une de mes préférées sur celui-ci, à la fois pour la qualité des paroles mais aussi pour la qualité de la musique. Au fait, peux-tu nous dire qui des paroles ou de la musique est venu en premier ?


GM:

Je pense que c'est la musique d'accompagnement. Ces temps-ci, les paroles viennent en dernier. Autrefois, la musique et les paroles venaient "main dans la main". Quand j'étais enfant; à peu près à l'âge de dix-huit, dix-neuf, vingt ans; la mélodie et les paroles venaient liées. Et, partant du fait que ce qui me branchait c'était les trucs qui accrochaient ainsi que cette véritable envie de marquer les esprits, j'avais l'habitude de conserver seulement dans ma tête l'air auquel j'avais pensé car j'avais le sentiment que si je ne m'en souvenais pas ce ne serait pas un tube. Alors que je comprends désormais qu'avec le temps tu peux oublier quelques unes de tes meilleures idées. Parce que celles-ci ne te restent pas nécessairement en mémoire, je note la musique d'accompagnement avant d'écrire une chanson. Une grande partie des airs que je crée, simplement en vertu du fait que je suis un piètre musicien en matière de prouesses techniques, est assez simple car c'est basé sur une musique d'accompagnement qui n'aurait pas pu être créer par un groupe de personnes juste assis et bloquant; je construit littéralement, de manière à ce que mon travail naisse. Il doit y avoir quelque chose de relativement hypnotique concernant ma sensation vis-à-vis de la musique d'accompagnement. En d'autres termes, il faut que cette sensation représente 50% de la chanson. Et de par le fait que je ne suis pas capable d’autant de prouesses musicales que cela, le gros du travail est donc vocal.

 

PG:

Deux chansons de l'album: Round Here et My Mother Had a Brother, ces deux-là sont très autobiographiques. A quel moment t'es-tu dit: "Cette partie de ma vie convient à cette chanson" ?

 

GM:

Pour Round Here, il me semble que j'ai juste pensé que ce petit fond de guitare avait quelque chose de légèrement poignant à propos de ma vie et se prêtait volontiers à la nostalgie. En règle générale, ce qui ce passe c'est que je vais me concentrer sur diverses choses que je vois soit dans ma vie, soit à la télévision, ou peu importe, et c'est comme si j'avais une sorte de classeur de mes pensées que je ne commence vraiment à feuilleter que lorsque j'écris. Mais alors, quand je suis dans le studio, quand j'ai écrit la musique d'accompagnement par exemple, ce que je fais à chaque fois c'est que je fais et refais le tour de cette musique d'accompagnement et je me met à prononcer un charabia, mais réellement un charabia. C'est plus une espèce de charabia musical et lyrique, je me plonge dans une sorte de monologue intérieur jusqu'à ce que quelque chose me vienne à l'esprit. C'est ce qu'il s'est passé pour Jesus to a Child par exemple - je pense que c'est mon titre préféré de tout mes albums - et ceci vient comme cela. C'est aussi le genre de chose qui n'arriverait pas s'il y avait quelqu'un dans les environs. J'envoie tout le monde dehors, je me sers de la machine qui enregistre mes paroles et je m'en sers complètement moi-même, je fais toutes mes propres retouches et le reste. J'envoie tout le monde dehors quand je commence à travailler, mon corps rempli toute la salle, littéralement, et mon monologue intérieur ou charabia serait si embarrassant si vous étiez réellement amené à l'entendre; c'est dans cette état que je commence à saisir les mélodies et les paroles, et qu'enfin je relie toutes les choses auxquelles j'ai pensé pendant tout ce laps de temps pour donner au final quelques idées pour une chanson. A aucun moment je m'assoies et me dis: « Bon! Qu'est-ce que je vais bien pouvoir écrire ? » Jamais.

 

(Jesus to a Child)

 

PG: My Mother Had a Brother, c'est si humain, si vrai, et si personnel. As-tu ressenti que c'était courageux de la faire ?

 

GM: Ce fut courageux d'un point de vue personnel, pour être honnête. Puisque je sais par exemple que, même s'il n'a rien dit, mon père n'est pas très ravi de cette chanson. Et j'ai en fait attendu pour l'écrire; j'aurais pu le faire il y a des années, car ça fait longtemps que je connais cette histoire, cependant j'ai toujours pensé que la sœur aînée de ma mère aurait été vraiment blessée par cette divulgation de secrets de famille, pour ainsi dire. Elle nous a quitté au début de l'année dernière et l'idée d'écrire la chanson ne m'a traversé l'esprit qu'à ce moment, et c'était alors la raison pour laquelle j'étais en train de l'écrire. Mais également, c’est très important pour moi parce que, d’une étrange façon, c’est à propos de ma mère et de sa relation avec moi. Parce que je crois dur comme fer que ma mère a sentit que j’étais gay, car les mères sentent cela ; je pense qu’elle l’a probablement sentit quand j’étais très jeune et, même si je ne pensent pas qu’il y avait une once d’homophobie en elle, son expérience de l’homosexualité venait du fait qu’elle pensait que son frère était gay et que cela avait peut-être largement contribué à la raison qui le poussa à penser qu’il ne pouvait plus vivre dans ce monde, n’oubliez pas que c’était dans les années 50. Quant à cette chanson, le fait que celle-ci parle de ce que sont les meilleurs choses pour la communauté gay et pour moi en tant qu’individuel, c’est pratiquement une façon pour moi de dire à ma maman que je comprend pourquoi elle a eu peur. Car il y avait des moments dans mon enfance où elle était au courant de quelque chose que moi non, prenez cela dans son contexte ; je ne pouvais pas savoir, du moins je ne pense pas, mais c’est ma manière de lui dire que je comprend. Je réalise que ma mère a vécu cela avec son frère et que c’est pourquoi elle aurait pu être nerveuse à l’idée que son fils puisse être gay. Pour tout cela, cette chanson représente beaucoup pour moi.

 

(My Mother Had a Brother)

 

PG :

Venons-en maintenant aux chansons que tu as préparées pour nous, et la prochaine que nous allons écouter est l’une d’entre elles, à savoir une reprise de Joni Mitchell.

 

GM :

C’est cela. Je suis un enfant des Seventies et je crois que les paroles devraient être aussi importantes par rapport à ce que l’on fait, et devraient refléter la vérité et la beauté absolument telles que les gens présumaient que cela était nécessaire dans les Sixties et les Seventies, et cela ne se séparait pas de la musique. Ce qui m’a intéressé avec Joni Mitchell, c’est qu’elle venait de cet idéal des Seventies ; les paroles sont absolument aussi importantes que le reste sur ses albums. De plus, ses paroles sont, je pense, incroyablement visuelles. Si vous prenez vraiment le temps d’écouter, petit à petit vous formez un environnement, ou une pièce pleine de gens, ou encore une situation particulière, et Joni vous en peint chaque détail, ce qui est quelque chose que je ne fais pas du tout, ce n’est vraiment pas mon style mais c’est quelque chose que je considère comme intrinsèque à Joni Mitchell, et c’est absolument représentatif du type de musique avec laquelle j’ai grandit.

 

PG :

Ecoutons cette chanson : Edith and the Kingpin.

 

(Edith and the Kingpin)

 

PG:

Vous écoutez ‘Sold on Song’, spécialement sur BBC Radio2. Je suis Paul Gambaccini avec George Michael qui vient juste de réaliser une reprise exclusive de Edith and the Kingpin de Joni Mitchell. Une raison particulière pour ce choix ?

 

GM :

Simplement parce que c’est ma préférée je pense. The Hissing of Summer Lawns est un album étonnant qui est écrit assez majoritairement à propos de Los Angeles. J’ai acheté cet album quand je vivais justement à Los Angeles et il y a des phrases incroyables dedans ; nous l’avons tous été, nous nous sommes tous déjà retrouvé dans notre lit en pleine nuit incapable de dormir, et dans un hôtel, c’est très souvent le cas dans les hôtels, à écouter le mécanisme de l’immeuble parce que vous pouvez en fait encore entendre tout ce qui s’y passe ; et il y a une phrase dans cet album où Joni dit : « l’engrenage dans les murs ronronne une mystérieuse chanson… », et je me suis dis : « Wouah, c’est tout à fait ça, non ? ».

 

PG :

En effet. Il y a quelque chose pour laquelle Joni est connu, et je pense que tu le fais un petit peu dans cette chanson, c’est le fait que tu parviennes à rendre ta voix chatoyante, mélodieuse.

 

GM :

Ah, vraiment ?

 

PG : Non. (Rires) En fait, si tu voulais dire quelque chose de plus modeste, tu pourrais plutôt dire que ta voix tremble dans cette chanson. Tu sais, quelque chose comme : « Sous un beau jour ensoleillé, l’eau miroitait… ». Peu importe, ce qui est évident, c’est que tu es compatible avec cette chanson.

 

GM :

Et bien, ce que je fais en travaillant une note de chant, et encore ne pensez pas que je comprenais déjà cela avant mais aujourd’hui je pense que c’est le cas, c’est que, et c’est sans doutes parfaitement et totalement représentatif de qui je suis en tant que personne, je pense que le masculin et le féminin se combattent l’un l’autre à chaque instant pour chaque parole que je chante. Et vous entendrez, littéralement, que je peux faire cela dans un mot ; l’intention de ce mot se situe là où je trouve cet équilibre entre masculinité et féminité. Si quelque chose est suggéré avec agressivité, cela à tendance à être chanté avec une approche beaucoup plus masculine ; mais si la fin de cette phrase m’apparaît être quelque chose que je perçois comme plus sensible, alors ça deviendra quelque chose de beaucoup plus féminin. Je suis en effet naturellement semblable parfois à une grande fille, et c’est juste la façon dont on m’entend sur les albums. C’est ma façon d’expliciter l’émotion ; c’est presque identique à ce vieux truc soul où tu peux chanter une femme dans son lit pratiquement en chantant comme une femme.

 

PG :

Un peu comme Marvin Gaye à qui Holland/Dozier/Holland disait : « Chante plus haut, les femmes adorent ».

 

GM :

C’est vrai. Les femmes trouvent cela très sensuel. Dans la musique Pop, il y a des choses qui expriment certains faits, comme Last Christmas par exemple : mon Dieu, on a l’impression d’entendre une vraie grande fille ! Mais c’est presque dû au fait qu’il y avait une certaine part en moi qui voyait pratiquement cela comme un des ces vieux disques produit par Spector. Et le réel sentiment à ce propos est si faible, si vous y pensez, mais je pense que c’est de là que cela provenait. Et de l’autre côté, il va y avoir quelque chose d’autre qui, je le pense, n’a pas de place pour la sobriété et la féminité, et ce sera chanté dans un ton différent. Mais je pense que ces deux façons de chanter me représentent.

 

PG :

Il existe un moyen qui pourrait améliorer ta façon d’écrire.

 

GM :

Oh, que veux-tu dire ?

 

PG :

Il y a le moyen général qui permet à tout le monde d’améliorer sa façon d’écrire et c’est du point de vue des paroles. Mais l’autre qui te concerne, c’est du point de vue de la production instrumentale.

 

GM :

J’ai pensé à la possibilité d’apprendre à jouer correctement du piano car j’ai toujours laissé de côté la théorie, et ceci de manière parfaitement intuitive ; et j’ai pourtant étudié la théorie musicale à l’école, mais, chose étonnante, j’ai carrément tout rejeté par la suite. De la plus étrange des manières, et je le jure devant Dieu, je ne pourrais toujours pas faire le lien, sur une guitare, entre les cordes et les notes. Je ne pourrais pas vous dire tant de choses basiques que cela à propos de la théorie musicale, tout simplement parce que j’avais ce sentiment vraiment inné que plus j’engrangeais de la connaissance, moins je passais de temps à composer ; et moins je cogitais sur un clavier, moins j’avais de chances de découvrir un truc très original. Cela me fait penser à d’autres auteurs-compositeurs que j’ai entendu, et je sais qu’ils ont fait de la théorie musicale et que ça leurs sert parce qu’ils savent comment composer, ils savent où l’accord se trouve, ils savent où la prochaine cadence doit être, ou bien où elle peut être, ou encore de quelle manière cela devient efficace ; tout ceci opposé au simple fait de littéralement se creuser la tête au-dessus d’un clavier, presque de façon puéril, et de trouver quelque chose qui t’inspire. Je pense qu’aujourd’hui, arrivé où j’en suis, la théorie m’aiderait sans doutes à explorer de nouveaux horizons. Néanmoins, je ne suis pas encore tout à fait sûr.


PG :

Tu as enregistré une version de Praying for Time spécialement pour nous, j’en déduirais que c’est toi le pianiste.

 

GM :

Tu plaisantes, non ?

 

PG :

Oh !

 

GM :

Je ne peux pas jouer du piano comme cela. Non, c’est mon directeur musical.

 

PG : Bon, écoutons-là, ici sur BBC Radio2 dans le ‘Sold on Song’ spécial George Michael.

 

(Praying for Time)

 

 

PG :

Il y a une phrase dans cette chanson sur laquelle je me suis toujours posé des questions puisque, selon moi, elle possède un double sens, c’est : « Charity is a coat you wear twice a year… » (La charité est une veste que tu portes deux fois l’an). Donc, soit c’est…

 

GM :

Ce n’est pas le sens littéral, c’est l’autre.

 

PG :

En effet !

 

GM :

Oui, la charité est une chose avec laquelle on se protège, dans le sens où cela te donne bonne conscience et te réchauffe le cœur deux ou trois fois l’an. Autrement dit, les associations caritatives telles que ‘Comic Relief’ et ‘Children in Need’ par exemple, tu leurs envoies un petit billet et te dis : « Hum, n’ai-je pas bon cœur ? ». Tu vois ce que je veux dire ? Je ne crois pas en cela. Je sais de source sûr qu’il y a moins d’argent parvenant à la charité puisque celle-ci est partout maintenant, cependant c’était aussi le cas avant qu’elle ne soit partout. Bien sûr, la charité est partout en Angleterre depuis les Live Aid/Band Aid, et était bien établit en étant déjà au départ un aspect cynique du business Américain. Ce qui explique la raison de cette fantastique juxtaposition d’une quarantaine de musiciens Anglais d’aspect assez violent, un Dimanche matin à Notting Hill, et six mois plus tard vous avez We are the World qui se trouve complètement à l’opposé. Mais en effet, la charité, selon moi, n’est pas quelque chose qui devrait être envisagé comme occasionnel, comme un événement annuel. La charité n’est même pas nécessairement une question d’argent, c’est une question de générosité.

 

(Fastlove)

 

PG :

Vous écoutez ‘Sold on Song’ spécial George Michael sur BBC Radio2. Ici Paul Gambaccini et nous sommes sur le point d’entendre une version d’une chanson des Isley Brothers. Tu m’as dis à part que tu étais surpris que beaucoup de gens ne pigent pas que…

 

GM :

…que les Isley possèdent une telle influence. C’est moitié Pop, moitié RnB, l’un n’étant pas dénigré par l’autre, et cela représente une part énorme de ce que j’essaye de faire. Mais également cette prestance, cette simple prestance vocale, cet homme chantant avec cette profonde chaleur, cela m’a beaucoup influencé. Et comme je l’ai dis, par rapport aux sons extraordinaires comme ceux chez les Isley, mon avis est qu’il y a un élément de Fastlove qui sonne comme chez eux, dans la manière dont les mélodies sont construites ; et cela simplement parce que je les adorais quand j’étais gamin et c’était l’une des premières choses que j’écoutai. Un de mes tout premiers souvenirs était Summer Breeze par les Isley Brothers que j’entendis alors que j’étais à Chypre, j’avais sept ans. Mais en effet, je trouve intéressant le fait que personne n’ait jamais remarqué cette immense influence parce que je la trouve assez évidente.

 

PG: Ecoutons donc For the Love of You

 

(For the Love of You)

 

PG:

Tu m’as fais part de la chanson qui, selon ta propre génération, te représente le mieux, et bien sûr Careless Whisper  est choisi année après année comme ta meilleure chanson. Est-ce une surprise pour toi ? Ou t’es-tu dis : « Oui, c’est la meilleure que j’ai faite » ?

 

GM :

Et bien, j’ai toujours pensé : « Mon Dieu, il y a une quantité de gens qui doivent se reconnaître dans cette chanson, à savoir tromper leur partenaire ! ». Car, non pas que je le sache, mais de toutes manières je ne saisis pas pourquoi il y a un tel engouement. Je reconnais que c’est une chanson Pop très bien construite et croyez-moi, ce fut composé très doucement ; et comme le ferait un enfant de dix-sept ans, je l’ai crée point par point avec Andrew. Seulement, j’ai toujours pensé que cette chanson était un peu trop pauvre pour être un succès. Voyez-là aussi pauvre que d’autres la voit. Et puis, je crois que les gens ont un goût assez sophistiqué malgré tout, alors vous allez me dire : « C’est Careless Whisper quand même ! ». Et je me dirai : « Ah ! ». (Rires).

 

(Careless Whisper)

 

GM : Tu sais, je préférerais largement écouter Jesus to a Child, A Different Corner ou même Last Christmas. Je suppose que je suis conscient de l’absolue naïveté avec laquelle j’ai écrit Careless Whisper ; mais évidemment c’est devenu quelque chose de très universel et cela, je ne le comprends pas ! Mais peu importe, je suis très reconnaissant envers cette chanson. Tu sais, si les gens me présentaient à leur grand-mère, ou même à leur arrière grand-mère si cela se trouve, en tous cas un parent qui ne me connaît pas, voire une personne qui parle de moi à son conjoint et qui dit : « George Michael, tu sais ? Careless Whisper, ‘Tara-rara-tara-ra, tara-rara-ra’ », et ceux-ci s’exclament : « Ah oui ! ». Je pense que c’est super d’avoir une chanson de ce type ; mais en même temps, c’est un peu effrayant de savoir que la chanson préférée des gens est un truc que tu as écris alors que tu n’avais que dix-sept ans ! Néanmoins, je suis très fier de Careless Whisper même si, comme je l’ai dis, ce n’est pas l’une de mes préférées. 

 

PG :

George Michael, ‘Sold on Song’, merci beaucoup!

 

GM:

Merci beaucoup également!

Repost 0
25 septembre 2000 1 25 /09 /septembre /2000 14:45

ENGLAND CONCERT

 

1er. DECEMBRE 1994   ROYAL ALBERT HALL

LONDRES

 

 

Someone Saved My Life Tonight w. Elton John

 

Don't Let The Sun Go Down On Me w. Elton John

Repost 0
Published by Miss Yog - dans APPARENCES DIVERS
commenter cet article
17 février 2000 4 17 /02 /février /2000 11:18

 


VH-1 Honours


10th April 1997 Universal Amphitheatre, Los Angeles


'Living for the city' w. Stevie Wonder

 

Repost 0
Published by Miss Yog - dans APPARENCES DIVERS
commenter cet article

Présentation

  • : GEORGE MICHAEL ' SONGS
  •                                                          GEORGE MICHAEL ' SONGS
  • : CHANSONS DE GEORGE MICHAEL- ALBUMS-TRADUCTIONS - CONCERTS - INTERVIEWS
  • Contact

  
  gmichael.jpg

george06.JPG

George Michael

 

 

   George+Michael+George+Michael+Announces+Return+iEdlCmUM5Vql

georgemichael_ahoy-2s.jpg

Georgios Kyriákos Panayótou